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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
help society of "frontline," the pbs program that many of us watch and respect, detailed one woman's story in great detail. but that wasn't an isolated incident. the national prison rape elimination commission, created by congress, has said -- quote -- "as a group, immigration detainees are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse and its effects while detained. the prison rape elimination act of 2003, known as prea, was designed to eliminate sexual abuse of those in custody. it was bipartisan, championed by the late senator ted kennedy and senator sessions of alabama and i cosponsored it. prea required promulgation of national standards to prevent, detect and respond to prison rape in america. there have been questions raised about whether those standards would apply to immigration detainees. and as i've said before, when we drafted and passed prea, it was our intent it would apply to all in federal detention, including immigration detainees. i was pleased when president obama issued a memo clarifying that prea applies to all federal confinement facilities and directing agencies to a
're looking around in the 5% range here pb that will be healthy, 5% to 10%. >> how about you, rich? do you agree or do you have a different number? >> i think we're getting close to full value. earnings are coming in better than expected. two-thirds of companies reported sales. and i don't think this is the 2000 period where everybody is talking about stocks, joe. if we get past the sequester issues with sdwb either with a little bit of a pullback, not the 5% to 10% that the other guest is looking for, the markets are going to have to work higher. there's no other place to put your money right now. the 2% ten-year note doesn't have the competition when the s&p is yielding 2%. so we're still very constructive. and if earnings continue to come in better, we're going to have to raise our target. even though we may be a value in the short run, i still think stocks are the place to be and it's not a frothy market at all. >> because it's hard to get a return anywhere else. but, rich, what is your viewpoint on gdp this year? >> we're at roughly between 1.5% and 2%. >> and you don't think the mark
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)